Boost Crosscut Sled Performance with Metal Runners

Tired of dealing with a loose or binding Crosscut Sled? Consider upgrading to adjustable metal runners.

There are many opinions about crosscut sled design. Just Google “crosscut sleds” and you will see it returns about 125,000 results.

This post considers what is under your crosscut sled – the runners. In the video I review my experience with two different types of aluminum runners.

What is your experience with crosscut sled runners? Do you prefer metal runners, or wouldn’t use anything except quartersawn hard wood, or maybe UHMW plastic? Go to comments and give your opinion.

Stepped Depth Cutting Jig for the Router Table

With this jig you can make your router table behave like a plunge router.

Having the ability to easily make multiple shallow cuts on the router table will improve the quality of your work with smoother, cleaner cuts and will extend the life of your router and router bits.

In the video below see how to make and use a jig that allows you to make a series of shallow, increasing depths of cut on the router table without readjusting the router bit depth.

Benefits of Multiple Shallow Cuts

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Workin’ With What You Got – Part 4

THROUGH THICK AND THIN

In part three of Workin’ With What You Got we looked at cutting key slots to reinforce the miters and making some specialized jigs to cut and mill some unusually shaped pieces which form the Taliesin lamp shade frame using the table saw and a very basic router table  made from shop scraps and cut-offs.

In the final installment of Workin’ With What You’ve Got you’ll see how some of the smaller parts of the Taliesin Lamp were dimensioned using a small parts thickness sander made from left over materials and a few inexpensive parts   – continuing the theme of workin’ with what you got.

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Workin’ With What You Got – Part 3

DOING A JIG

No – not that kind of jig – I’m talking woodworking!

Workin’ With What You Got – Part 2 covered the importance of accurate and repeatable 45º angles – one of the defining features of the Taliesin Lamp.


In part three we look at cutting key slots to reinforce the miters and making some specialized jigs to cut and mill some unusually shaped pieces which form the Taliesin lamp shade frame using the table saw and a very basic router table  made from shop scraps and cut-offs – continuing the theme of workin’ with what you got.

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Workin’ With What You’ve Got – Part 2

Necessity is the Mother of Invention

In Workin’ With What You’ve Got – Part 1  I made the point that many woodworking operations can be accomplished through creative thinking and using tools you already have. In part 2 I continue with some tips on how I approached building the Taliesin Table Lamp, including some photos of the tools and jigs I made.

A prominent feature of this lamp is all the 45 degree splined mitered corners. I do not have a miter saw and find the miter gauge on my table saw is not very accurate. Also, in order to build the square base all four sides must be exactly the same length to get tight miter joints.

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Workin’ With What You’ve Got – Part 1

TOOLS DO NOT MAKE THE WOODWORKER

Sometimes when watching the TV woodworkers one gets lulled into the thought “I could make that too if only I had the tools he has”. Then rolls the credits after the show and you see it is sponsored by the companies of same brand tools he was just using.

When contemplating a specific project, instead of thinking what you don’t have and why you can’t build it, approach it by considering what operations you need to perform and how you can do them with what you already have.

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